Ankle Pain


Ankle Pain

A sprained ankle can also lead to other foot, ankle and calf conditions such as peroneal tendonitis, plantar fasciitis and achilles tendonitis.  A tendonitis condition could result from a previous ankle injury (sprain).  Because of an old injury, the ankle joint may have lost mobility that will cause the tendons to work inefficiently.  The result of the abnormal stresses to the tendons lead to inflammation or tendonitis.  Another characteristic of ankle pain is muscle weakness.  The ankle and foot are not able to provide the proper stability which leads to increased stress on the ankle joint and muscles.  A third problem that results from an ankle injury is decreased balance or proprioception.  After an ankle injury, a common description is a weak, unstable ankle.  Many people will report turning their ankle over easily on uneven ground.  The muscles do not react to alterations in foot/ankle positions.  A lace up ankle brace may be indicated for unstable ankles for 4-6 weeks until strength and balance gains have been achieved.  Some people may need to wear a brace during activities that challenge a persons balance and stability.  

Achilles tendinopathy could be caused by many different reasons.  Tendinopathy relates to a chronic condition of the tendon that includes tendonitis.  Ankle mobility (lack of or increased), leg and/or ankle weakness, training errors, faulty shoes, or even medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and or high cholesterol can lead to a tedinopathy.   Common descriptions include pain in the area of the achilles tendon and increased pain and stiffness after being inactive.  Depending on the severity, the symptoms may decrease after warming up and then increase with continued activity.  

The treatment plan may include the use of soft tissue mobilization, dry needling, joint mobilization, stretching, strengthening, and a shoe evaluation.